Influence: Amena Amer

Amena Amer-Monochrome mosaic:

Image

“This is a photograph of a mosaic wall in the Grande Mosquee de Paris. Completed in 1926, the mosque was built in recognition of the thousands of Muslim from the French colonies who fought against Germany in World War I.

The complexity of Islamic mosaics, the colours and the way in which each of the coloured pieces complement each other to create an artistic masterpiece that never fails to enthrall, but can at times overwhelm the eye. Thus, I chose to take the photograph in monochrome as a means to highlight the beauty of the pattern created by the muted.” Amena Amer, 2012

These patterns evoke wonderful memories in me of visits to the great Mosques in Saudi Arabia, Paris and London. While before I was unaware of the influences towards my sculpture; I now recognise the complexity of such patterns and the convolution that it shares with Islam, but the meaning -for the moment- eludes me. I am aware that the lines, scopes and patterns that are formed through geometry contain a complexity that mirrors the Islamic ethos.

Submission

Submission

Submission, 2012
Plaster of paris

This sculpture recalls Islamic ethos; the correlating internal and external dimensions to the Islamic submission of prayer and prostration.

The structures allude to an allegorical representation of a Muslims intention for prayer and ablution followed by the purification of the soul through Salah. A Muslims personality is a testament to One God: an evocation of submission that revolves around our faith. Just like our personalities, we are submitting externally too by maintaining hijab, through a covert contextual meaning the laws that govern the interaction between male and female which must be abided by both.

The creation of this sculpture (and the entire collection) evokes memories of personal struggle to uphold my Islamic values from a young age, like many other Muslims around the world with the submerged identities of British, Indian, and Muslim, I am striving to maintain both identity and religion.

Dimensions: 6″ * 6″ 2 (six inch by six inch squared)